Special Needs

Countering the Failures of the School System for Autistic Students

There is often a sense that children with complex needs are unable to make progress, but Michael Bogg shows how by addressing students’ individual situations and developing their well-being and self-esteem, real progress is not only possible, but inevitable.

Excellent progress is the goal of all teachers. The way to achieve it is the million-dollar question. I work in a Resource Centre, which is attached to a mainstream school, for children with a diagnosis of Autism. There are currently 23 children and three classes, broadly in the following groups: EYFS/KS1, lower KS1/KS2 and upper KS2. Some children take part in sessions in the mainstream school, but most of our children spend the majority of time with us in the Centre. 

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