Children with SEN Are More Psychologically Stressed

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Between 18 and 27 per cent of children with SEN have ‘high’ or ‘very high’ psychological difficulties scores compared to between 11 and 13 per cent of children without SEN. A main aspect of this data is peer interaction, where children with SEN reported having much greater  peer relationship problems, according to a report by the National Pupil Database.

A high 27 per cent of SEN pupils reported having peer relationship issues; they also reported being bullied by non-SEN students.

A second part of the census, called ‘Understanding Society’ looked at the social wellbeing of children with SEN. It  had more positive results aspects. Children with SEN have similar levels of unhappiness to children without SEN regarding their appearance, their family and life as a whole.

The big differences come only when we look at the results from the classroom.

A different study carried out by the City University of London and the DfE titled the ‘Wellbeing of Secondary Age School Pupils with SEN’ showed very similar results Children with SEN have similar levels of unhappiness to children without SEN regarding their appearance, their family and life as a whole, but there were differences when looking at other areas of their lives, particularly those to do with school.
Children with SEN are more likely than children without SEN to be indifferent) about:

  • the school they go to (19 per cent compared to 7 per cent)
  • their school work (13 per cent of children with SEN compared to 6 per cent of children without SEN),
  • their friends (8 per cent compared to 4 per cent), and
  • their life as a whole (17 per cent compared to 11 per cent)

The biggest differences between children with and without SEN being ‘unhappy’ are for their views on their school and their school work.

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