Special Needs

Ambitious Alternatives Changing the Narrative of Disadvantage

Disadvantage and poverty are always correlated with negative educational outcomes, but do they need to be? Dr David Armstrong shows how some innovative programmes are turning that around and creating ambitious alternatives.
Girl in blue shirt sat at front of class

One of my roles at PwC (PricewaterhouseCoopers) is as the lead Partner for the world’s largest education programme for marginalised girls. We deliver it for the UK’s Department for International Development (DFID), and it’s called the Girls’ Education Challenge (GEC). The overall aim of the GEC is to educate over 1 million marginalised girls in 18 African and Asian countries. We’ve been doing this work with DFID since 2012. It’s a huge agenda, a massive challenge, and I’m very proud of what the programme has achieved (see girlseducationchallenge.org for an overview).

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