Inquisitive kids leaving parents stumped

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According to the survey, adults find questions about life events such as the arrival of a new brother or sister the most challenging, with nearly half of parents reporting that they find these difficult to answer. Additionally a quarter of the adults’ surveyed were perplexed by their children’s science questions such as “why is the sky blue?” and “how many stars are there in the sky?”

In response to the tricky questions posed by their children, nearly half of parents said that if they don’t know the answer they would take the time to look up the answer with their offspring. However, over a quarter of parents admitted to being creative with the truth in order to distract children from their question if they are unsure of the answer.

The survey findings show that many parents experience an upsurge of questioning during the summer holidays with 49% and 47% of parents respectively saying that boredom and long car journeys are catalysts for their little ones’ inquisitiveness.

Whilst potentially trying for parents, this incessant questioning should be an encouraging sign for mums and dads as a report by Read On. Get On. suggests that asking lots of ‘why?’ questions is a key stage in language development which is vital in getting children ready to learn to read when they enter the classroom.

Speech and Language Therapist Kate Freeman says: “Studies find that if children don’t have strong language skills at age five they can get left behind when they start school and struggle with learning to read. That’s why it’s so important for adults to chat with children to help them develop the essential language skills needed to be ready to read when they enter the classroom. ”

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